Weekly outline

  • Wks.1A-2B. Core Study: The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century

    ParisExpositionLessons in Wks.1A-2B introduce students to:

    Preliminary Reading:

    The People's Century episode 1 1900 - Age of Hope

    File: 1
  • Wks.3A-4B Core Study: The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century

     In the topic The Nature of European Society at the beginning of the twentieth century students examine a range of sources, primary and secondary, written, graphic and film, to learn to

    • describe social organisation in Europe at the beginning of the twentieth century
    • explain social change and continuity at the beginning of the twentieth century.

    Preliminary Reading:

      The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century (Moodle Book)  

    Books: 2Quiz: 1Page: 1
  • Wks.5A-6B Core Study: The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century

     The topic The Nature of European Society at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century continues encourage students to develop 

    • depth in knowledge of social organisation in Europe at the beginning of the twentieth century
    • sophisticated understanding of social change and continuity at the beginning of the twentieth century.

    Preliminary Reading:

  • Wks.7A-8B Core Study: The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century

    In the topic The Nature of European Society at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century students examine a range of sources, primary and secondary, written and statistical, to learn to

    • describe economic organisation in Europe at the beginning of the twentieth century
    • explain economic change and continuity at the beginning of the twentieth century.

    Preliminary Reading:

  • Wks.9A-10B Core Study: The World at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century

    In the topic The Nature of European Society at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century students examine a range of sources, primary and secondary, written and statistical, to learn to

    • describe urbanisation in Europe at the beginning of the twentieth century
    • explain urbanisation in Europe at the beginning of the twentieth century.

    Preliminary Reading:

  • Wks.13A-14B Meiji Ishin in Japan: Nature and Impact

    Meiji Ishin in Japan: Nature and Impact

    Students learn to:

    • describe the main features of the Japan before the Meiji Ishin 1860s
    • explain the contribution of the Tokugawa shogunate to Japan in the Edo Period
    • assess the role of social and economic forces in producing change in nineteenth century Japan  
    Page: 1Quiz: 1
  • Wk.16B-17A The Creation of the German Empire

    Anton von Werner 1871Otto von Bismarck  & the Unification of the German States

    The Franco-Prussian War and the Creation of the German Empire 1870-1871

    Students learn to:

    • outline the main events of the creation of the German empire and constitution 1870-1871
    • explain the role of Bismarck in the creation of the German Empire
    • explain the features of the constitution of the German Empire
  • Wk.18B-19A: Meiji Ishin in Japan

    Topic 1 Internal Conditions that allowed modernisation to take place

    Students learn to 

    • outline and describe the internal conditions (political, economic, social and technological features) in Japan that allowed modernisation to take place
    • explain the reasons for modernisation in Japan in the Meiji era
    • assess the extent and success of modernisation in Japan in the Meiji era
    Pages: 4Files: 2
  • Semester 2 Wks.1A-2B

    11_HTM_Course_Meiji_AmericanJapaneseRepresentatives_1853Meiji Ishin in Japan ~ Topic 2 Modernisation

    In this topic students learn to

    • outline and describe contact between American and European imperialism and Japan in the period 1853-1860s
    • explain the impact of trade treaties with foreign powers on developments in Japan
    • explain the reasons for political instability in Japan in the 1860s
    Page: 1
  • Wks.5A-6B

    Emmeline Pankhurst and the Suffragette Movement 1905-1914

    Students learn to :

    • overview the life and contributions of Emmeline Pankhurst
    • explain the role of Emmeline Pankhurst in the Women's Social and Political Union
    • Assess the contribution of the Emmeline Pankhurst and the WSPU to campaigns for the enfranchisement of  women 1905-1914
    Files: 3Pages: 4Quiz: 1Book: 1
  • Wks.7A-8B

    The Later Suffragette Campaigns 1910-1914

  • Semester 2 Wks.7A-8B Preliminary Modern History Core Study

    The Causes of the First World War

    In this topic students:

    • describe the features of international relations 1900-1914
    • explain reasons for international rivalries and alliances
    • analyse the role of individuals in international affairs 1900-1914
    • evaluate the motives of individuals and groups in decisions for war 1914

    File: 1Pages: 5
  • Semester 2 Wks.9A-10B Yearly Examinations

    Revision and Preparation for Task 4 Yearly Examination 

  • Semester 2 Wks.13A-14B The War on the Western Front - Reasons for the Development of Stalemate

    map: SchlieffenPlanIn this topic students learn to 

    • describe the war on the Western Front in 1914
    • analyse and evaluate the role of key features, individuals and events in the development of stalemate on the Western Front
    • use historical terms appropriately
    • analyse and evaluate sources for their reliability and usefulness
    • explain and evaluate differing perspectives and interpretations of the war on the Western Front.

     

    Page: 1Files: 2Quiz: 1
  • Semester 2 Wks.15A-16B The War on the Western Front

    The War on the Western Front - Strategies & Tactics to Break the Stalemate 1915-1917

    In this topic students learn to 

    • describe strategies and tactics to break the stalemate on the Western Front 1915-1917
    • analyse and evaluate the role of key features, individuals and events in the war on the Western Front
    • use historical terms appropriately
    • analyse and evaluate sources for their reliability and usefulness
    • explain and evaluate differing perspectives and interpretations of the war on the Western Front.

    Pages: 5File: 1
  • Semester 2 Wks.17A-18B The War on the Western Front

    The War on the Western Front - The Battles of Verdun, the Somme, Passchendaele

    In this topic students learn to 

    • describe strategies and tactics to break the stalemate on the Western Front 1915-1917
    • analyse and evaluate the role of key features, individuals and events in the war on the Western Front
    • use historical terms appropriately
    • analyse and evaluate sources for their reliability and usefulness
    • explain and evaluate differing perspectives and interpretations of the war on the Western Front.

    Pages: 3Files: 3
  • Semester 3 Wks.3A-4B

    The Impact of the War on Civilians in Britain and Germany

    In this topic students study different types of sources

    • to identify evidence useful to historians studying 
      • the concept of total war and its social and economic impact on civilians in Britain and Germany

      • recruitment, conscription, censorship and propaganda in Britain and Germany

      • the variety of attitudes to the war and how they changed over time in Britain  and Germany
      • the impact of the war on women's lives and experiences in Britain.
    • to respond to historiographical issues related to World War I

     

    Preliminary Reading

    File: 1Page: 1
  • Semester 3 Wks.5A-6B The War on the Western Front

    Students study the evidence for historians' debates about turning points in the war on the Western Front:

     

    1. the impact of American entry to, and Russian withdrawal from the war, 1917-1918 
      1. evidence relating to the treaty of Brest-Litovsk 1918
      2. reasons for US entry to the war - and the implications of these for Allied strategy 1918
      3. the extent of US contribution to the war on the Western Front 1917-1918
    2. Ludendorff's Spring 1918 Offensive and the Allied response.
    URLs: 2File: 1Pages: 2
  • Semester 3 Wks.7A-8B The German Collapse 1918 & Versailles Treaty

    In this topic students study the evidence for historians debates about the Allied victory in World War I 1918 including:

    1. the events leading to the Armistice 1918
    2. the reasons for the Allied victory and German collapse
    3. the roles and differing goals of Clemenceau, Lloyd George and Wilson in creating the Treaty of Versailles 1919 

    Pages: 3Files: 3
  • Semester 3 Wks.9A-10B

    Japan 1904-1937

    Japan as an Emerging World Power 1904-1921

    12_HTM_Course_Japan_Russo-JapaneseWar_Diplomacy.jpg

    In this topic students learn about Japan as an emerging power 1904 to 1919 through

    • expansion in East Asia in the Russo-Japanese War 1904-1905 and the annexation of Korea 1905-1910
    • participation in World War I 1914-1919, including the 21 Demands (1915)

     in order to investigate features of and historical issues concerning:

    • nature and impact of internationalism
    • nature, growth and impact of imperialism
    • aims and impact of Japanese foreign policy

    Preliminary Reading

    Andrew Gordon A Modern History of Japan from Tokugawa Times to the Present  chap. 8 Empire and Domestic Order § The Trajectory to Empire pp.113-122

    Quiz: 1Page: 1
  • Semester 3 Wks.11A-12B

    Japan 1904-1937

    Topic 2 Challenges to Traditional Power and Authority in the 1920s

    12_HTM_Course_Japan_Challenges1920s_TaishoChic_01v2In this topic students learn about challenges to traditional power and authority in Japan as a result of political, social and economic issues in Japan by 1921, including 

    • the introduction of limited liberal democracy
    • political influence of the zaibatsu
    • impact of the Seiyukai and other political parties on Japanese political systems and governments
    • challenges of the genro, bureaucracy and army to party politics

     in order to investigate features of and historical issues concerning:

    • successes and failures of democracy
    • changes in society
    • tensions between tradition and modernisation

    Preliminary Reading

    Andrew Gordon A Modern History of Japan from Tokugawa Times to the Present  chap. 8 Empire and Domestic Orde

    • § Contexts of Empire, Capitalism and Nation-Building pp.122-125
    • § The Turbulent World of Diet Politics pp.125-129
    • § The Era of popular Protest pp.129-135
    • § Engineering Nationalism  pp.135-137

    Page: 1Quiz: 1
  • Semester 3 Wks.13A-14B

    Personalities in the Twentieth Century  

    Kita Ikki (1883-1937)

    In the study of Kita Ikki students use their prior learning about the historical context of

    • legacy of the Meiji era: political, social, economic
    • World War I: Japanese participation and its impact
    • nature of the growth of Japanese nationalism and imperialism
    • the weakness of Taisho governments in establishing liberal democracy

    to describe and explain key features of Kita's:

    1. Background 
      1. family background and education 
      2. membership of the Black Dragon Society, supporting revolution in China 
    2. Rise to prominence
      1. The Unofficial History of the Chinese Revolution’ (writing)
      2. Plan for the Reorganisation of Japan’ and its banning in 1920
      3. political activism, including 1925 arrest for protesting Hokkaido land sales
      4. support for the Plan from young Army Officers

    in order to

    1. assess Kita's
      1.  significance as a writer, political activist and agent of change
      2. impact on Japanese militarist & nationalists
      3. influence on ideas of:
        1. Japanese imperialism in Asia
        2.  the role of the Emperor
      4.  influence on 26 February 1936 coup
    2. evaluate historians' debates about Kita as, for example, a genuine patriot or a fanatical propagandist.

    Preliminary Reading

    Page: 1Files: 2URL: 1
  • Semester 3 Wks.15A-16B

    Japan's Foreign Policy 1921-1931

  • Wks.17A-18B

    The Rise of Militarism in Japan in the 1930s

  • Semester 3 Wks.19A-(20B)

    The Growth of Tensions in the Pacific Region 1930s-1941

    Students learn about

    • tensions arising from economic and political rivalries in the Pacific region by 1937
    • Japanese foreign policy 1937–1941
    • US and British policies in the Pacific 1937–1941
    • strategic and political reasons for bombing Pearl Harbour

     in order to identify key features of and historical issues arising from 

    • imperialism and responses to it
    • nature and impact of nationalism

    Preliminary Reading:

    Thomas Cantwell Contested Spaces: Conflict in the Pacific' chap.2 pp.20-46.

    Files: 4Pages: 2
  • Semester 4 Wks.1A-2B

    The Strategic and Military Implications of the Fall of Singapore, Burma, Java and the Philippines

    Students learn about

    • strategic and political reasons for bombing Pearl Harbour
    • Japanese expansion December 1941-June 1942
    • social, political and economic impact of war on civilians in occupied territories, Australia and Japan

     in order to identify key features of and historical issues arising from 

    • imperialism and responses to it
    • nature and impact of nationalism
    • impact of the war on the home fronts of Japan and Australia
    • impact of the war in Occupied Territories in South-East Asia

    Preliminary Reading:

    Thomas Cantwell Contested Spaces: Conflict in the Pacific' 

    Documentary:  


    Page: 1Files: 2
  • Semester 4 Wks.3A-4B

    Revision and Preparation for Trial HSC Examination

    Copies of the Core Study from past HSC examination papers from 1989-2005 are available for study and answer practice. It is important to note, however, that there have been two changes of syllabus since 1989, so that past papers between 1989 and 2000 do not examine precisely the same material as the present syllabus does. Students should be aware of TWO important differences:

    • some sources and questions make specific reference to Australia's involvement in World War I
    • between 1989 and 2005 the Core Study was worth 30 marks; in the present, revised syllabus the Core Study is worth 25 marks. Question 1 will be worth 5 marks rather than 10 marks as in the past.

    You can navigate to any paper by using the link for the specific year:

     

    Revision Guide to the option units, i.e. Japan 1904-1937, Kita Ikki and Conflict in the Pacific 1937-1951

    File: 1
  • Semester 4 Wks.5A-6B

    The End of the Conflict

    Pages: 2
  • Semester 4 Wks.7A-8B

    12_HTM_Course_Conflict_EndConflict_Macarthur_hirohitoThe End of the Conflict: Allied Occupation of Japan, Hirohito and War Crimes Tribunals

    Students study the features and characteristics of events involved in the end of the conflict in the Pacific 1945-1951 in order to 

    • describe the Allied occupation of Japan 1945-1951 and explain its aims
    • assess the consequences, and extent of success, of the Allied occupation of Japan 1945-1951
    • analyse the issues involved in the (Tokyo) War Crimes Tribunals (IMTFE)
    • discuss the status of the Emperor

    Preliminary Reading

    Students study

    1. Pollock & Cantwell Contested Spaces: Conflict in the Pacific 1937-1951 chap.9 The Occupation of Japan 1945--1951
    2. Andrew Gordon A Modern History of Japan from Tokugawa Times to the Present chap.13 Occupied Japan
    3. Documentary: Japan in Ruins (series) episode 1 The Day the War Ended
    Pages: 6File: 1Quiz: 1
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